Questions & Answers


171-180 questions


180. thank you for the great effort you put in wermac.org
179. use spiral wound type b-gasket on type a-flange
178. i would like to understand the meaning of valves; nominal trim term
177. must the flow in the pipe be reduced prior to insertion?
176. data in your website is not correct
175. is weldoflange an unlisted component to asme b31.3?
174. standard sizes for large pipes
173. error in description
172. i am looking for typical crotch wall thickness and fillet radius...
171. simple device will be connected into a pipeline...
 

Question 180: thank you for the great effort you put in wermac.org

Dear Mr.Werner,

I would like to thank you for the great effort you put in wermac.org, it is really the greatest piping platform on the internet, I have learned a lot from Wermac and I use it a lot as a quick reference, this email can not express my appreciation to your effort.

I am creating an introductory course in Arabic for fresh engineers about piping and for sure I am using Wermac as one of the references as codes and handbooks and I can imagine it took to build this great platform!

And please allow me to acknowledge you and wermac in the course.

Thank you from Egypt!
Ahmed

Hi Ahmed

Thank you very much for your compliments to wermac.org. I am always happy when I can help others; together we know more. If you want to use my website in teaching courses, that's no problem for me.

greetings Werner

 

Question 179: use spiral wound type b-gasket on type a-flange

Hello,

I would like to know your opinion on one of the issue we are facing. Our vendor by mistake use spiral wound Type B-Gasket on Type A- Flange (26 inch Class 150). Would it be acceptable in your opinion and experience.

Regards,
Kashif Aziz

Hi,

My first answer is: do not! use the gasket that is prescribed for a given flange.

In the table below you can notice that there is a substantial difference in the outside diameter (outer ring) of the gasket.

Spiral Wound Gasket
SPW Gasket for flanges 26in Class 150 ASME B16.47 series B
Inner Ring Sealing Element Outer Ring
d1 d2 d3 d4
654.1 673.1 698.5 725.4
All dimensions are in millimeters
SPW Gasket for flanges 26in Class 150 ASME B16.47 series A
Inner Ring Sealing Element Outer Ring
d1 d2 d3 d4
654.1 673.1 704.9 774.7
All dimensions are in millimeters

The outer ring has the purpose of centering the gasket between the bolts in order to obtain an even distribution of the sealing part.

As you can also notice, the dimensions of the sealing section are almost identical, and a good seal can be obtained with a 26in-150lbs series B gasket between 26in-150lbs series A flanges. Of course, care must be taken to ensure that the sealing portion of the gasket is parallel to the gasket face of the flange.

In this case, it is possible to obtain a reliable seal, but certainly has not my preference.

Take a look at this page of my website.

greetings Werner

 

Question 178: i would like to understand the meaning of valves; nominal trim term

Hello,

I would like to understand the meaning of valves; "nominal trim" term. I can't understand the meaning of the numbers designated under "nominal trim" term, for example API 7 valve's nominal trim number as following: 410 - Very Hard.

I would be very thankful to explanation about that.

Best regards,
Artyom Kustov

Hi Artyom

Take a look at this page of my website.
If it doesn't answer your question, let me know.

greetings Werner

 

Question 177: must the flow in the pipe be reduced prior to insertion?

Hello,

When inserting a line stop on a 16" Carbon Steel pipe, must the flow in the pipe be reduced prior to insertion? Is there a risk of damage to the equipment if this is not done?

Cori McKee

Hi Cori McKee

My first answer to your first question is yes. If you want to place a line stop in a pipe, the pipe must be pressureless; flow should preferably also be avoided.

However, there are other ways to make a line stop.
Line Stops, sometimes called Stopples start with a hot tap, but are intended to stop the flow in a pipe.

For more information, look at: Hot tapping & Line stopping on this website.

Your second question is not entirely clear to me.
Normally the line stop will not be damaged if the right conditions are met.

greetings Werner

 

Question 176: data in your website is not correct

Hi Sir,

I've noticed that highlighted data in your website is not correct (Attached Image).

Given that the radius for DN750 for 3D Bends is 2286, Center to Face would be calculated using below formula:
B= R * tan(22.5)
for this size the B would be : 2286 * 0.414 = 946 MM
but in your website is 964

Thanks for such a good website.
Best Regards
Reza Safari

Hi Reza Safari

Thank you for your awareness; I have restored it.

greetings Werner

 

Question 175: is weldoflange an unlisted component to asme b31.3?

Hi Werner,

Is weldoflange an unlisted component to ASME B31.3?

Do we need to provide an area-reinforcement calculation and include it in design document?

Regards,
John Garganta

Hi John,

ASME B31.3 does not tell you anything about weldo flanges, but about the welding of Branch Connections.
Use as criteria e.g. a Weldolet.

greetings Werner

 

Question 174: standard sizes for large pipes

Dear Werner Solken,

I am currently researching pipe sizes as part of my design project at university. I recently came across your website, which provides standard sizes for large pipes. However I can't seem to find which material of pipe these sizes relate to. Are they suitable for stainless steel pipes?

The sizes I require must correspond to a material of pipe that is able to input steam into a furnace and then transport superheated steam to a reactor further downstream of the plant ( so a good resistance to corrosion is required)

Please could you let me know which materials the standard sizes are suitable for? Are they only the sizes for carbon steels for example?

Thank you in advance.
Kind Regards,
Iqra Shah

Hi Iqra Shah,

Unfortunately, you do not specify which table of dimensions you mean.
In the menu, pipes, you will find DIMENSIONS OF PIPES ASME B36.10 / 19, for carbon and stainless steel up to 48 inches.

greetings Werner

 

Question 173: error in description

Dear Sir/Madam,

It is my please to address you, I am using your website for a long time and I really appreciate your service.

In following link: socket_weld_general.html heading is given as ELBOW 90 degree for ELBOW 45 degree, I thought it would be wise to let you know.

Regards,
Tanveer Ahmed

Thank you for your awareness; I have restored it.

greetings Werner

 

Question 172: i am looking for typical crotch wall thickness and fillet radius...

Hi Wermac Representative,

My name is Bobby Virdi and I'm a stress engineer at Stress Engineering Services Canada. I am working on a project and have a few inquiries. I am looking for typical crotch wall thickness and fillet radius for the following tees.

If you can please provide some guidance on these parameters, it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Bobby Virdi, P.Eng.

I can not give you a serious answer.


ASME B16.9-2003 Section 2.2 Design of fittings says:
... it is expected that some of the portion of the fittings is in the pipeline.

Because there is no maximum tolerance for some parts of the fitting, the customer himself must indicate his requirements. Depending on the customer specification, the manufacturer must certify that the manufactured tee is made the requested requirements.
He can do that with additional drawings, with additional wall thickness measurements etc. verified by an independent party or a customer inspector.
All of these additional cost money tests, so many things higher, as the tee itself.

This also applies, of course, to elbows, and other pipelines that change direction.

greetings Werner

 

Question 171: simple device will be connected into a pipeline...

Hello Werner,

we found your amazing website and it turns out, that you have answers to so many questions and maybe you could help me out in some things. However, I am wondering, why you answer all those questions and why your complete website is for free. So I guess, you must be the Santa Claus for the petrol industry ;)

Flow Capture is a small company, has a great knowledge about multiphase flows, X-rays, and some other stuff. But I really know little about flanges, pipelines ANSI, ASME.

We are developing a simple version of our product, REX-CELL, that is roughly something like a flow-CT.

This simple device will be connected into a pipeline, just like a flow meter or a Gamma densitometer. We focus on 4 inch pipes with a pressure rating from 600 to 1500.

We are looking for the perfect small flange and I wonder if a clamp flange is the right choice or if there are other special flanges, that could be simply integrated.

For a helpful answer, I would honestly express my thanks to you.

Best regards
Robert Klaus

Answer from Werner Sölken

Please show me more about your company, your website and your product.

Then I can give a serious answer, I think.

question 171greetings Werner



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